A Virtual Reality Space War for iPhone

You can get more app developer updates and game support at aliengemwar.com.

Now available in the App Store!

Battle alien saucers and harvest energy gem towers in this retro sci-fi action shooter that will demand all your VR fighting skills!

Made for freely available Google Cardboard VR, this game is a whirlwind of space war survival that incorporates combat shooting, movement tactics, clock management, and balancing various skills to outwit the enemy aliens and transport energy gems off the planet surface.

You’ll have to stay in constant motion and fend off attacks that come from all directions as you attempt to fly around the battle zone shooting down alien saucers and bombs while protecting and harvesting your gem towers.

This game is deceptively simple but extremely difficult to master. Survive as long as you can against increasing difficulty and figure out how to get the score bonuses.

No ads. No in-game purchases. Just simple straight ahead fun.

No hand controller is required for this game, just a simple and inexpensive Google Cardboard VR viewer. It works without even needing to pull the trigger on your Cardboard viewer. It’s almost entirely shoot and move by aiming. You can choose to use the trigger for firing your main gun and a special extra skill test that you can discover, but the trigger is not required.

Get yourself an inexpensive Google Cardboard compatible VR viewer like the ‘View-Master Deluxe VR Headset’ or ‘Merge VR Goggles’ and have a blast that will get you feeling like you are living inside a classic science fiction adventure world.

You can also play in non-VR mode.

This game has been tested on iPhones as old as the 6s.

A Game Center leaderboard is included.

This game requires a high amount of physical movement and uses the full 360 degree range of VR.

Children should play with adult supervision. Play VR games in a safe open area, free of obstructions, obstacles, and hazards. For increased safety, play while sitting in a swivel chair.

 

Tarot of Marseille: A Complete Online Celtic Cross Reader and Guide Book

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Yes, this is software I wrote that is a fully capable and very powerful 10-card Tarot reader. I didn’t know of any online readers that utilized the magnificent Marseille Tarot deck which is considered by many to be the greatest Tarot deck of them all. So I made one. Perhaps you have read Alejandro Jodorowski’s book, The Way of Tarot. It is one of the few books available in English on the use of this historic deck of cards. Right here is where you can fully explore the Marseille deck and get actual readings. As many as you like. The software allows you to shuffle and reshuffle the cards, then pick each one. Your reading is explained and some machine learning code kicks in and analyzes the general tone of your reading.

Sound good? Sound somewhat unusual? I think it is. I also think you will learn a lot about the cards here because each card in your reading is clickable and opens up an in-depth explanation of the card and its meaning in the Celtic Cross spread. I have also written a guide to the deck covering the major arcana, court cards and the number cards. The Marseille Tarot requires some understanding of how it relates to numerology so I have covered that as well.

These are the main features:

  • Written in HTML5 so it will work in a browser on most devices
  • Uses the classic Marseille Tarot deck
  • Full 78-card deck shuffling
  • Uses the popular 10-card Celtic Cross spread for readings
  • Includes reversed card meanings
  • Includes simple list readings and narrative readings
  • Artificial intelligence feature analyzes the tone of your reading
  • Get in-depth card meanings when you press the cards in your reading
  • Comprehensive introduction to Tarot

Launch the Tarot Reading

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Les Mysteres Du Tarot De Marseille: French Tarot Documentary

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This is a fascinating French documentary exploring the artistic connection between the oldest deck of Tarot cards known as the Tarot de Marseille and 15th century art. The documentary travels to Italy where Tarot was born to follow various leads and look at examples of the oldest Tarot decks and Italian art.

The work of Sandro Botticelli features prominently, as does Plato’s philisophical cave allegory which deals with the nature of reality and whether what we see is just a rough projection of reality. The connections between this idea and the Tarot’s Devil card are fascinating.

The documentary is entirely in French without English subtitles, so you’ll probably need to speak French to enjoy this.

Tarot Documentary Narrated by Christopher Lee

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In preparation for the upcoming Tarot section of this blog, complete with a brand new online Tarot reader, here is a television documentary on the history of Tarot cards. It’s narrated by the super-hammy Christopher Lee!

The best thing about the documentary is its brief outline of Tarot history. Its explanations of card meanings and interviews with Tarot readers are superficial and absurd. The interviewees tend to be of the type who predict actual events and make foolish assumptions rather than focus on what the cards suggest to a person and what they represent as possibilities in that person’s thinking. Most of the unfortunate people featured in this documentary are of the variety that the Tarot tradition should avoid at all costs. Pay no attention to them.

Enjoy the film for what it is and remember that if you have an interest in Tarot you won’t be disappointed in the new app which will be a very deep resource of information about the entire Tarot de Marseilles deck and will give full 10-card Celtic Cross readings with explanations and card details.

Coming soon!

Rabbit Ears: Experimental Film by Alessandro Cima

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Imagine an insane alien astronaut who tunes into earth’s radiating television signals originating in the analog days of the twentieth century. The alien receives our entire TV culture in seconds, processing the sounds and images instantly, watching them all simultaneously… and the alien is crazy enough to find a message within.

This is an experimental film that is for all intents and purposes a continuation of my previous film, “The Magical Dead Sunstroke Valley,” which has been screening for the past year at the Los Angeles Center for Digital Art (LACDA).

1980 Documentary on the Making of Punk Zine Guttersnipe in Telford, England

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Councillor Mrs. Mary Potts described the magazine as ‘decadent’ and ‘utter filth.’

I can’t imagine a better compliment for a zine really.

This is a 1980 television documentary produced by the BBC’s Community Programme’s Unit which specialized in what amounts to local access television. This one is a very down to earth look at a small town British punk zine called ‘Guttersnipe.’ What’s great about this film is how it lets the people do the talking. It doesn’t make the mistake that a lot of television made back in the seventies and eighties when they tried to define the punk movement in rather stilted terms which only served to expose the terror of the producers themselves when faced with something they didn’t understand.

The young people in this film speak with honesty, frustration and great humor. They weren’t willing to accept boring so they made a culture with what was at hand. We can learn a lot from these Telford punks today when we seem so in the spell of technology corporations that it is hard to imagine ever creating a culture again. How do you ever feel unsatisfied when you have an iPhone in your hand and can read anything written anywhere on earth within seconds? How do you muster the energy to stop twiddling thumbs and print something? Or play a guitar?

Sure, I love computers as much as anyone else. I find them incredibly inspiring and empowering. Perhaps it’s really the Web that’s the problem. Not the machines.

The Web has become a nearly unusable up and down scrolling mechanism so burdened underneath the weight of endless and intrusive advertising that I personally dread visiting nine out of ten web sites. There is very little pleasure in browsing anymore. It’s not a nice environment. Things pause, pop into your face, jump around the screen, go inexplicably black, stop mid video, suddenly rewind, jump left, jump right, go totally blank and infect your computer. It’s basically hell. The Web as a reading experience stinks now. No question about it.

Makes one want a zine in one’s hands to sit back and read like humans were meant to read.

Enjoy the documentary.