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‘Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs’ is possibly the greatest fairy tale of them all from the Brothers Grimm. In this full 30-minute production you will hear a cast of characters, completely original orchestral music, songs, and fantastic sound effects. We tell the story in a way that is unlike any you have heard before. When we made this audio story we worked very hard for months to get it right. We made it as carefully as we would make a film. The entire production is cinematic in its scope and we think it is the most exciting story we have ever done. So turn off every distraction, dim the lights, and enjoy thirty minutes of incredible adventure.

We’d love to hear your comments and reviews of this production. Feel free to send your feedback.

In addition to listening, you can also read our complete original script for the production.

Here are the credits for this production:

Snow White…….Karen Tucker
Snow White’s Mother…….Jane Kinsey
Queen…….Julia Gregory
Narrator…….Alessandro Cima
Dwarfs…….Joshua Fardon and Alessandro Cima
Huntsman…….Steven Oliver
Directed by Alessandro Cima
Adapted by Alessandro Cima and Steven Oliver
Music, Lyrics and Orchestration by Joshua Fardon
“Looks Like it’s Going to Rain” and “Queen’s Song” sung by Julia Gregory
Music Recorded at Fountain Entertainment Studio
Special Thanks to Renato Biribin and Joanne Glover

The black & white illustration used in our ad above is by Walter Crane (1886)

Duration: 00:30:58
File Size: 29.1 megabytes

All audio stories are Copyright © Candlelight Stories, Inc., All Rights Reserved. Do not distribute copies of our MP3 audio or video stories. They are for your personal use. If you choose to burn our MP3 stories onto a personal CD, do not make copies of the CD or distribute them to other people. Also, do not sell CDs containing our audio stories. All audio stories are copyrighted by Candlelight Stories, Inc.

The Audio Script

Narrator:

Once upon a time in winter, when the snowflakes were falling like feathers from heaven, a beautiful Queen sat sewing at her window, which had a frame of black ebony wood. As she sewed, she looked up at the snow and pricked her finger with the needle. Three ruby red drops of blood fell into the soft white snow.

Snow White’s Mother:

Oh, what a lovely sight. If only I had a child with skin white as snow, lips red as blood, and hear black as ebony wood.

Narrator:

Soon afterward, the gentle Queen gave birth to a little daughter who was as white as snow, as red as blood, and as black as ebony wood. She was called Snow White. But alas, shortly after the little one arrived, the Queen became ill. She could not get better and soon she died, leaving the king devastated and little Snow White without a mother.

A year passed and the King took for himself a new wife. The new Queen was the most beautiful woman in all the land, and very proud of her beauty. She had a mirror, which she stood in front of every morning.

Queen:

Mirror, mirror, on the wall,
Who in this land is the fairest one of all?

Mirror:

In all the land, my Queen,
From this castle to the Seven Jewel Mountains,
You are the fairest one of all.

Narrator:

And so the Queen knew for certain that no one in the world was more beautiful than she. And year after year the mirror would say:

Mirror:

In all the land, my Queen,
you are the fairest one of all.

Narrator:

Then, Snow White had her seventh birthday and the Queen stood before the mirror once more.

Queen:

Mirror, mirror, on the wall,
Who in this land is the fairest one of all?

Mirror:

You, my Queen, are fair; it is true,
From this castle to the Seven Jewel Mountains.
But Little Snow White is now
A thousand times fairer than you.

Queen:

What!? My own step-daughter? Fairer than I? Curses! I hate her! For she is more beautiful than I.

Narrator:

The Queen became pale with envy. Whenever she looked at Snow White, she hated her and wondered if she would ever again be the most beautiful in all the land. This turned her heart cold and barren. For ten years her jealousy gave her no peace.

Finally on the eve of Snow White’s eighteenth birthday, she summoned a huntsman.

Queen:

Take Snow White into the forest. Find a lonely spot, and shoot an arrow through her heart. As proof that she is dead bring the heart back to me.

Huntsman:

But your Majesty!

Queen:

As proof that she is dead, bring her heart back to me!

Huntsman:

But Snow White is the beloved jewel of all the kingdom!

Queen:

Silence! If you do not obey my command, you shall die.

Huntsman:

I will obey, your Majesty.

Narrator:

The very next day, the huntsman took Snow White deep into the forest. The unsuspecting girl wandered into a clearing where she sang a delicate song while picking flowers. The huntsman stepped behind a tree and waited until Snow White turned her back to him. Then, raising an arrow to his bow and pulling it back to his open eye, he peered at the princess with as heavy a heart as he had ever felt. Many moments passed as his arm trembled. He could hold it no longer. With a heart-wrenching shout he shot the arrow. It streaked through the air on its deadly flight and slammed loudly into a tree. Snow White cringed in terror. The huntsman had missed.

Huntsman:

Go, my child! You must run away and never return. The Queen wants you dead, but I cannot do it. Go!

Narrator:

Snow White ran into the forest. The huntsman killed a wild pig and cut out its heart. He took it back to the Queen and made her believe it was the heart of Snow White. That night, the huntsman slipped out of the kingdom to hide in the forest never to return.

Meanwhile, Snow White was alone in the great forest as a storm filled the night sky with a howling wind. She was terribly afraid. She climbed over stones and crawled through thorns that slashed like the claws of terrible beasts. Everywhere she looked danger appeared. Every way she turned seemed more frightening than the last. Rain drenched her in a tremendous downpour as the sky roared with thunder and lightning.

Snow White:

How could this happen to me? My stepmother wants me to die. The huntsman spared my life only to let me die in the forest. I am lost and my world is gone.

Narrator:

She could feel the dark shadow of doom closing in on her. Snow White cried out and fell to the ground. With a feeble effort she lifted her head and spied an opening to a small cave just beyond a great tree. With her last bit of strength she crawled into the cave and hid from the storm. Overcome by exhaustion, she curled up and fell asleep.

Dawn woke the forest to the song of the birds and Snow White was soon awake. A whole world was stirring to life and the young woman was glad to feel some of her fears slip away. She stepped out of the cave. Thick trees stood like a wall ’round her. As she moved between them, she stumbled upon a path. She walked along it, full of hope, until she came to a clearing. There stood a strange cottage with a tiny door, tiny windows and a tiny chimney pot. Everything about the cottage was much tinier than it ought to be. Snow White went to the door and pushed it open. Bending over so she could fit under the ceiling, she found it to be a cozy home with a table all set with seven places for a meal.

Snow White:

I wonder who lives here? What tiny plates! And spoons! There must be seven of them. The table’s laid for seven people. Seven very little people.

Narrator:

Upstairs, was a bedroom with seven little beds. The house was warm, friendly and charming, but hardly neat. Everywhere she looked there was some household chore that needed doing.

Snow White:

Whoever lives here needs help keeping it neat and clean. I shall clean this house and cook its seven owners a delicious meal. Then perhaps they’ll let me stay here for a while.

Narrator:

She set to work cleaning the cottage. With a delicate and happy touch she worked until the house came to life. Pans were polished, floors swept, and linen changed. Cobwebs were brushed away, clothes hung in their closets, and the windows were wiped clean as crystal water.

Then there was the food. Snow White seasoned up a stew that simmered so deliciously through the house and into forest that even the most timid animals came close to the tiny cottage. Soon, Snow White made friends with these animals large and small. The clearing around the cottage was filled with the sounds of birds, squirrels, rabbits, frogs, deer, and the tiny mice that live in holes near the banks of streams. Little by little Snow White felt less alone.

As she looked around the cottage admiring her work, her eyelids felt heavy and she thought how nice it would be to take a small nap before the tiny people returned.

Snow White:

I’ll just sleep for a few moments so I will be better company when I meet them.

Narrator:

So she climbed the stairs to the bedroom, lay across several tiny beds and drifted off to sleep.

Some distance from the clearing around the cottage, about an hour’s march through the trees, lay the Seven Jewel Mountains. Deep inside these mountains was a diamond mine. Inside this mine were seven hard-working, jolly little dwarfs who toiled each day digging for diamonds. These seven dwarfs lived in the cottage where Snow White slept. They took great pride in their work and great pleasure in each other’s company.

Dwarf 1:

Swing your pick and crack that rock!

Dwarf 2:

Look inside and whaddaya got?

Dwarf 3:

A diamond as big as my foot is what I got!

(Mining Song)

Narrator:

As the day was coming to an end, the long march home had to be started. Carrying their pickaxes and shovels, they made their way, as they had a thousand times before, through the forest and back to their home.

They were always pleased to see their little house, but this time it looked magical. Candlelight gently shimmered through the windows. The chimney spewed a calm stream of smoke and the smell of a simmering stew put them into a trance. They stood in the clearing with their mouths wide open, not sure whether to be frightened or pleased.

Dwarf 1:

What’s happened to our home?

Dwarf 2:

It’s never, ever, looked like this before.

Dwarf 3:

And what is that delicious smell?

Dwarf 2:

Careful, men, it could be a trap.

Dwarf 1:

Only one way to find out.

Narrator:

So, slowly but surely, they crept toward the house. They opened the door and could not believe their eyes. The cottage gleamed. Everything was exactly where it should be.

Dwarf 3:

A place for everything, and everything in its place.

Narrator:

As they gingerly explored each corner of their cottage, the littlest one found his way up to the bedroom. He bolted out, barely able to contain himself and waved frantically to the rest of them.

Dwarf 2:

Come here! Come look! Someone’s asleep in our beds!

Narrator:

The seven dwarfs fetched their seven candles and all came running. They took one look at the sleeping Snow White and cried out with amazement.

All Dwarfs:

Oh me! Oh my!

Dwarf 1:

She is as lovely as can be.

Dwarf 3:

Well, let’s wake her up and find out what she’s up to.

Dwarf 1:

No, let her sleep. She’s earned it.

Narrator:

So, patiently and with great reverence they all sat around and watched her sleep, amazed and touched by her gentle beauty. Finally, after an hour or so, she stirred.
Snow White put her hands up to rub her eyes. When she pulled her hands down she was startled to see the seven tiny men.

Snow White:

Oh! You’re here! I’m Snow White. I hope you don’t mind that I made myself at home here in your charming little house.

Narrator:

They stared at her for several seconds without saying a word.

Snow White:

Can you talk?

Dwarf 1:

Why sure we can talk? And may we ask how you made our home so bright?

Dwarf 2:

And where’s the dirt that I got on the floor last year?

Dwarf 3:

Where’s the pie I hid behind the cupboard?

Dwarf 1:

And what about the twigs in my pillow?

Narrator:

They spent the night asking all their questions. Snow White told them how the Queen had tried to kill her and how the huntsman had spared her life. The dwarfs pitied her, shocked that anyone could even think of trying to kill such a sweet and beautiful girl.

Dwarf 1:

You may stay here as long as you like.

Dwarf 2:

As long as ever you like. And longer too!

Dwarf 3:

Our house is your house.

Dwarf 2:

And your house is this house, the whole house and all the pots and pans and curtains too.

Dwarf 1:

Each day, while we work in the mines, you can work here at the house. It has never looked this wonderful. Not ever. Does that suit you?

Snow White:

Oh, but, of course. That is a wonderful idea. I shall make it a perfect house.

Dwarf 1:

You will be alone in the house each day when we are gone. Do not let anyone come in. There will be no one to save you.

Snow White:

I won’t let a soul inside. I promise.

Narrator:

The next morning, the seven dwarfs said goodbye to Snow White and marched of to the diamond mines for a hard day’s work. Back in the palace, the Queen was glowing with confidence that she was once again the most beautiful in the land. She strode to the mirror and asked the question she was sure she knew the answer to.

Queen:

Mirror, mirror, on the wall,
Who in this land is the fairest one of all?

Mirror:

Deep in the forest
In a cottage owned by seven little dwarfs,
In the shadow of the Seven Jewel Mountains,
Little Snow White is still a thousand times fairer than you.

Narrator:

Slowly the mirror’s words seeped into her brain and with each passing second the Queen’s blood boiled hotter and her rage grew deeper.

Queen:

Get me the huntsman! Get him for me now!

Narrator:

The servants scurried off to do their Queen’s bidding while she grabbed the box which supposedly contained Snow White’s heart. She looked at it carefully.

Queen:

This is the heart of a pig, not Snow White! Where is the huntsman?

Servant:

Gone, your Majesty. No one has seen him since he took Snow White into the forest.

Queen:

The huntsman has betrayed me! Get out! Leave me alone!

Narrator:

For the Queen, there would be no peace. She would not rest until once more the mirror declared her the most beautiful woman in all the land.

Queen:

Snow White will die if it costs me my own life.

Narrator:

At last she thought of what to do. She disguised herself as an old peddler woman and painted her face so that no one would recognize her. Then she went into her most secret room deep in the caverns beneath the castle.

Into a great black cauldron she poured a deadly liquid potion. The fire roared and the potion boiled. Steam filled the cavern with the foul smell of sinister magic.

Queen:

(Magic potion song)

Now, Snow White, your loving Queen comes to visit you.

Narrator:

The next day, as the Queen traveled into the forest, the wind began to howl through the trees. But so single-minded was her hatred of Snow White that she scarcely noticed. Finally, she reached the door of the cottage.

(Knocking Sound)

Snow White:

Who is it?

Queen:

Just an old peddler-woman selling her wares. I’ve brought with me today some very beautiful apples, my dear.

Narrator:

Snow White peeked out through the window.

Snow White:

I’m not allowed to let anyone in. The dwarfs have forbidden it most severely.

Queen:

If you don’t want to, I can’t force you. But you have a kind face, so I will just leave one here on your doorstep for you to put in a pie.

Snow White:

Dear old woman, I can’t accept anything. The dwarfs don’t want me to.

Narrator:

But Snow White saw the old peddler woman walking away toward the trees. The unsuspecting girl threw open the door and picked up the shiny red apple.

Snow White:

Oh, thank you kindly, dear old woman. I will gladly accept your sweet offer.

Queen:

It is nothing but my pleasure, dear.

Snow White:

What a lovely apple it is.

Narrator:

And Snow White bit into the poison apple. She barely had the bite in her mouth when she fell to the ground in a sleep of death.

The Queen was beside herself with glee, cackling like a witch, and gloating over the sweet girl’s body.

Queen:

More beautiful than I? Ha! Now who is the fairest in all the land?

Narrator:

And with the poor girl dead on the ground, the Queen headed back to her castle. But now she began to notice the building storm. Louder and louder did the winds howl and the thunder and lightning crackle. Fear crept into her mind as it became harder to follow the path out of the forest. She began to run in a frenzy, thrashing her way through branches and thorns.

By the flashes of lighting, someone was watching.

High atop a stone mountain, the huntsman had made his hideaway. He spied the Queen as she ran through the forest below. Now frightened beyond her wits, she ran, hoping to find her way back to the castle. The huntsman saw her every step. The thunder roared. The rain was a blanket of water. A lightning bolt flashed and the Queen saw the huntsman against the sky. She watched in terror as he drew back his bow string and aimed.

Queen:

NOOOOO!

Narrator:

With a feather touch, the huntsman released his arrow. It streaked on a deadly path right into the heart of evil Queen.

Queen:

AAAAAAGGGHH….

Narrator:

She dropped dead on the spot. The huntsman, rain pouring from his brow, stood still on the mountain, staring silently at his prey.

As the last breath left the Queen’s body, Snow White stirred on the ground and opened her eyes. She sat up in confusion and blinked at the storm that howled around the little cottage. The sleeping spell was broken.

Snow White:

How strange. Where am I? What cottage is this? I am so far away from home. I must find my way back again.

Narrator:

Snow White made her way across the clearing and headed into the forest. While the storm raged around her, she crept along beneath the swaying trees, never straying from the path toward home. She leapt from stone to stone and crossed the rushing stream. Rain-soaked and chilled by the wind, she followed the winding path through the trees. Neither afraid nor confused, Snow White thought only of her home in the castle where her father was king.

She walked through the night as the storm died away. By sunrise, the forest rejoiced at the sight of Snow White. When she reached the castle, all the people were overjoyed to see her alive and well. A great feast was declared in celebration and all the kingdom turned out to sing and dance for an entire day.

The huntsman came down from his mountain hideaway and returned to the castle. The King, after hearing the story of how he killed the evil Queen, made him his royal huntsman.

The story of Snow White’s adventure traveled far across the land until a handsome prince heard it and set out on his horse to meet her. When he arrived at the castle, Snow White took one look at him and kissed him. They loved each other in an instant and the prince asked Snow White to marry him. The very next day, Snow White did, and, after a grand royal wedding, they both lived happily ever after.

THE END

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