The Rooster That Wouldn’t Crow: An Audio Story By Artie Knapp

Here’s something fun for kids. An audio story by Artie Knapp, the author of quite a few illustrated stories that have had a home right here on the web for a long while now. This is a very well-produced audio story with a full cast of actors and an original music score. So settle in with some popcorn on the sofa and get ready for a charming tale of individuality.

Here are the credits for the story:

Written by Artie Knapp

Narrator – Alessandro Cima

Toby – Eric Knudsen

Peter Harpole – Don Smith

Mrs. Harpole & Paula the Hen – Christine Jones

Annie & Ellie – Kristen Erdman

Edited by Sachin Kumar

Music by Valentin Sosnitskiy

The Little Mermaid: 1968 Soviet Animation of the Tale by Hans Christian Andersen

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This is a beautiful 1968 Soviet adaptation of ‘The Little Mermaid,’ by Hans Christian Andersen. It was produced by the great Soyuzmultfilm studio. There are no subtitles. Just enjoy it as a brilliantly animated musical approach to a great tale.

The film begins with a busload of tourists sightseeing in Copenhagen. Then it moves to sea and our story begins…

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The Tale of the Dead Princess and the Seven Knights: Russian Fairytale Animation

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This is a 1951 Russian animation of an 1833 fairytale poem written by Alexander Pushkin that is based upon the classic Grimms tale, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. It was directed by Ivan Pyetrovich Ivanov-Vano, known as the ‘patriarch of Soviet animation.’

You can read Pushkin’s The Tale of the Dead Princess and the Seven Knights.

The film is in Russian so you can use the YouTube settings to turn on English subtitles.

Beauty and the Beast: Russian Animation

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This is a 1952 Soviet film adaptation of a variation on the Beauty and the Beast story called 'The Scarlet Flower', written by Sergey Aksakov in 1858. This story focuses much more on the bargain made between the unseen beast and the girl's father when he touches the scarlet flower on the magical island that is the beast's home than in the versions most American audiences are familiar with..

The animation technique in use here is called rotoscoping. Actors were filmed in costume doing their character movements, then traced frame-by-frame to create what was supposed to be a more realistic animation. In fact, rotoscoping often produces a curiously lifeless movement in conflict with the more fantastic backgrounds.